Story of Fennovoima

Finland's youngest nuclear power company has grown to become a work community of hundreds of professionals. We have what it takes to produce emission-free electricity for Finland. This page tells Fennovoima's story through its most significant events.

Finland's latest nuclear power company has grown to become a work community of hundreds of professionals. We have what it takes to produce emission-free solution for Finnish electricity production. This page is telling Fennovoima's story through it most significant events.
 

Year 2010

2010

The Board of Directors of the Council of Oulu Region approves a nuclear power regional plan for Pyhäjoki in January 2010. The Ministry of the Environment approves this plan in August.

In May, the government decides to grant Fennovoima the Decision-in-Principle, and in July, the parliament approves this decision with 121 votes to 71.

Year 2009

2009

In January, Fennovoima submits its application for a Decision-in-Principle to the government, seeking for a decision on a power plant with 1–2 reactors and naming Toshiba or Areva as plant suppliers.

The municipal council of Pyhäjoki votes 16–5 in favour of the Fennovoima project and gives this way its support to locating the nuclear power plant there. At this stage, the project is taken further on four alternative localities, so Fennovoima representatives are a familiar sight in different public events and mass meetings.

In October, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) gives its favourable opinion on the safety of the Fennovoima project, as a part of the Decision-in-Principle process.

Year 2008

2008

In January, Fennovoima submits its environmental impact assessment programme to the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment over a new nuclear power plant to be built in Finland. Fennovoima evaluates three different nuclear power plant types, including Areva NP’s EPR and SWR-1000 plants and Toshiba Group’s ABWR. In October, an environmental impact assessment report is presented to the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment.

Local offices are opened in alternative sites: Pyhäjoki, Simo, Kristiinankaupunki, and Ruotsinpyhtää.

Year 2007

2007

Fennovoima is founded as a joint venture by four companies: Outokumpu, Boliden, Rauman Energia, and Katternö. They are linked by their need for reasonably priced electricity, so a new nuclear power plant of their own is seen as an improvement to the energy self-sufficiency of both the shareholders and Finland as a whole. German E.ON is chosen as the partner for this project, as its strong nuclear power knowhow was needed.

Survey of possible sites starts right away. To start with, the list of possible sites included as many as 40 municipalities. The layout and technical design of the site area begin the same year in order to discover the size of the power plant and how much space it will require. In addition, the environmental impact assessment of the nuclear power plant starts.

At the end of 2007, approximately ten people work in the project.